Course Registration Information - Spring 2022

Find below a list of all courses being offered in AFVS this semester, including information on how to preview and register. Information will be updated here as it becomes available – check back for dates and times of live Zoom info sessions, and links to course Canvas sites. See the catalog at my.harvard.edu for full course listings.

 

For a list of all courses and their Course Preview Period info sessions, click here.

FS 30X - The Life Project

FS 30X - The Life Project - Carrie Lambert-Beatty
Tu 12:45-2:45

Registration: Course open to First Year Students Only; see https://freshmanseminars.college.harvard.edu/ for a step-by-step process. This seminar is for anyone interested in contemporary art and culture, extremes of human behavior, or willpower and its limits. 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/95059 

What happens when contemporary artists treat their everyday lives as artistic material, "sculpting" their eating, sleeping, or living habits and reporting on the process? What kind of art is this? In the era of reality TV, personal informatics, and "challenge literature" have such projects gone mainstream? How do they relate to the "life projects" of ascetics, experimental subjects, or the mentally ill? 

GENED 1114 - Painting's Doubt: A Studio Course 

GENED 1114 - Painting's Doubt: A Studio Course - Matt Saunders
W 1:30-2:45 + studio sections to be scheduled on W, Th, F from 9-1 or 3-7 

Info session to be held via Zoom on Friday, Jan 14 at 11am – see Canvas site for Zoom link 

Registration: This course has an enrollment cap, so to be considered, you must request permission to enroll and rank your choices through my.harvard by 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, January 18. The Gen Ed lottery will run Wednesday, January 19 with approvals and denials sent out no later than 11:59 p.m. that day. Visit https://gened.fas.harvard.edu/spring-2022 for more information and step-by-step instructions.

Studio sections will be scheduled for W 9am-1pm, Th 9am-1pm, F 9am-1pm, W 3-7pm, Th 3-7pm, or F 3-7pm. You must be able to attend one of these sessions to enroll in the course. If you are granted permission to enroll, you will be able to select your section based on a first-come, first-served process at the time of enrollment.

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/100219/assignments/syllabus

Painting is an engagement between the self and the world. It is a practice of embodied making, and, as a language outside of words, can think around conditioned understanding. This introductory studio art course proposes learning to paint as a new experience of relating to the world, and through painting we will investigate not only what we have to say, but what we have to see. 

Studio assignments in small sections are complemented by weekly lectures, visiting artist presentations, readings and visits to Harvard’s collections. The primary materials for this course will be oil on canvas, with some excursions into drawing and work on a paper. No experience is necessary, except a willingness to make a mess. 

AFVS 35R - Building Thought: Sculpture Course

AFVS 35R - Building Thought: Sculpture Course - Annette Lemieux
TuTh 12:00-2:45

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101352

Using a variety of materials and methods, students will build and create artworks that reflect their ideas, with an emphasis and understanding of the language of images, materials, forms, actions, and presentation. Through images, videos, and informal discussions, students will be introduced to the concerns of conceptual artists of the 20th Century to the present. 

AFVS 40A - Introduction to Still Photography

AFVS 40A - Introduction to Still Photography - Elle Pérez

WF 12:00-2:45

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: Admission to this course is by application only, there are no interviews. Course Petitions are not accepted in lieu of an application, you must do the application to be considered - see Canvas site:

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101321

This course provides an introduction to the visual language of photography. Students will be introduced to the technical, conceptual, and historical aspects of the medium. We will focus on gaining familiarity with digital techniques and aesthetics through demonstrations and hands-on sessions that cover technical topics such as camera operation, proper image exposure, digital workflow (including RAW files and Camera Raw) Adobe Bridge and Photoshop, and digital printing techniques. Lectures and class discussions will provide historical context and an overview of historical and contemporary artists. Weekly photographic and written assignments will be given and regular critiques will be used to assess student work and progress. The class will conclude with a final project that reflects your individual and original interests, and a high level of engagement and investment with photography. 

AFVS 41A - Introduction to Still Photography

AFVS 41A - Introduction to Still Photography - Sharon Harper
MW 12:00-2:45 

Course Preview Period Info Session: Tuesday, January 18 at 12pm; Zoom link available on the Canvas course site. 

Registration: No prior art experience necessary for enrollment in this class. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures:  

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101846

This studio course will introduce you to the conceptual, artistic potential of photography. Your understanding and use of the medium will be contextualized within contemporary and historic photographic art practices.   Your own art practice will be developed alongside technical skills. We will discuss topics such as the ethics of photographing people, how to make meaningful images amid the proliferation of digital images, and traits that are unique to photography. This class is organized around presentations on artists’ work, presentations on photographic concepts, studio making assignments, individual meetings with the instructor and breakout meetings with peers to develop your practice, technical skill workshops, readings, reading discussions, group critiques, and visiting artist presentations. Curiosity, a strong work ethic and a sense of adventure are required. Technical skill development is supported by the class Teaching Assistant. 

AFVS 112 - Drawing 2: Model Witness

AFVS 112 - Drawing 2: Model Witness - Katarina Burin
TuTh 12:00-2:45 

Optional info session on Tuesday, January 18 at 11am - link on Canvas site. To be considered for enrollment, you must submit the requested form (available on Canvas site) by Tuesday, January 18 at 4pm.

Registration: This course is open to anyone who has some experience with creative visual work. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures:  

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101913

This studio art course foregrounds the medium of drawing, investigating its many potentials, both on and off the page. Drawing is positioned as model and as witness, and as something which carries ideas forward. It is experimental, light and flexible, while maintaining the ability to record direct process or be deeply specific. 

Students will explore the potential of depicting both literal and metaphorical space, including the space of personal or collected memory, of future possibility and the imprint of time and process. Working in two-and three-dimensions we will strengthen our conceptual, technical and artistic visual skills. 

AFVS 114 - Hoarding Fever/Archive Fatigue (Studio Course)

AFVS 114 - Hoarding Fever/Archive Fatigue (Studio Course) - Katarina Burin
W 3:00-5:45, plus a required lab Fri 1:30-3:30pm

Registration: This is an introductory studio course available to all levels of experience open for grad students and undergraduates. Hoarders and non-hoarders are welcome! Course Preview Period period info session to be held Tues, Jan 18, at 12:30pm (Zoom link here) - to apply for the course, please submit a questionnaire (available on the Canvas site) by 5pm on January 18: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/102174

Why do we decide to keep things? What politics hide in taxonomy? How do citizenship, colonialism, and death relate to our stuff? And what’s the deal with Marie Kondo?  

This studio course will use the discourses around Archive and research-based practice as a starting point for developing work in a range of media. We will look at existing archives, develop our own collections as a form of artistic practice, and destabilize the authority of archives by considering informal, queer, pathologized forms of collecting. The course will include discussions and readings; visits to local collections in and outside the museum; and ample studio time to work with raw and found materials, alongside obsessive investigations and meandering digressions. 

AFVS 123R - Post Brush: Studio Course

AFVS 123R - Post Brush: Studio Course - Annette Lemieux
TuTh 9:00-11:45

Registration: Recommended prep is at least one AFVS studio course, or permission of the instructor. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/102007

Using the silkscreen printing process, students will create paintings and objects that incorporate images and text found in popular culture. Through slides, videos and informal discussions, students will be introduced to the Pop artists of the 20th century as well as other contemporary artists. 

AFVS 139L - Letters to a Young Artist, Part 2

AFVS 139L - Letters to a Young Artist, Part 2 - Carissa Rodriguez
M 1:30-5:45 

Info session TBD 

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

Link to Canvas site forthcoming

Studio course in interdisciplinary art with a focus on Institutional Critique– a form of conceptual art that questions the power structures underlying the circulation and display of art. Through assignments in sculpture, installation, mixed media, moving image and performance, students experiment with form and content and are introduced to critical methods and practices, as well as the pragmatics of exhibition-making. The course covers a social history of the studio, gallery, museum and artist-run spaces, with attention to art collectives and social justice movements that have challenged institutional structures. To complement our studio work, we look at 20th and 21st century art movements, highlighting BIPOC and LGBTQ+ artists of the canon. Guest artists, curators, and gallerists give presentations on their distinct roles in the field. Through a series of independent projects, students take practical and experimental leaps from art student to art world (one institution to another) and test the possibilities for shaping the terrain as artists. 

AFVS 146J - Where are We Going? The Photograph in Contemporary Art

AFVS 146J - Where are We Going? The Photograph in Contemporary Art (Studio Course) - John Edmonds
Tu 1:30-5:45 

Course Preview Period Information Session and Q&A: Tuesday 1/18 at 3pm, followed by brief individual meetings. Zoom link and sign up sheet for meetings are on the Canvas course site. Students who cannot attend the info session should e-mail Teaching Assistant Allison Cekala at allisoncekala@fas.harvard.edu to set up a meeting at another time.

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101896

Through presentations, course readings and critiques, this studio course in photography will examine strategies photographers and artists working in photography used to accept, negate, refuse, reject, interrogate, subvert, rewrite and complicate the “documentary” nature of the medium and its role in contemporary art and society. Students will make work and examine the evolution of photography and media from the 1980’s to the present, developing a language that expands photographic thinking to include its relationship with but not limited to: painting, sculpture, pop art, journalism, performance and film.  Key texts include those written by: Roland Barthes, Andy Grundberg, Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, Hito Steyrl, Uri McMillan, Laura Wexler, Charlotte Cotton and Carol Squiers. 

AFVS 162 - Sound Studio Workshop: This is a show tune...

AFVS 162 - Sound Studio Workshop: This is a show tune, but the show hasn't been written for it yet - SCRAAATCH
Th 3:00-5:45 

Info session TBD 

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

Link to Canvas site forthcoming

This course is a sound studio/workshop exploring the way sound communicates narrative, examining the way sound aids narrative in drama and beyond as well instances where artists and musicians have created music for imagined dramas or conceptualized a song or album as a drama, which is what Nina Simone is describing in the line from the song "Mississippi Goddam" from which the course title is derived. Students will listen to Orson Welles' 1938 radio drama "The War of the Worlds", watch films, listen to songs, albums and soundtracks, and create stand-alone compositions that function or are conceptualized as radio dramas and soundtracks.  Students should be prepared to think critically and experimentally about sound and the work they produce and be able to articulate their process and goals for their work. This class will include projects, readings, screenings, listening sessions, discussions, and workshops. 

AFVS 196R - Directed Research

AFVS 196R- Directed Research - Stephen Prina
W 6:00-9:00 

There will be a mandatory introduction and interview session held on January 14th at 6pm EST. Zoom link and link to questionnaire on the course Canvas site.

Registration: Recommended for concentrators in Art, Film, and Visual Studies in their junior and senior year but also open to others with permission of the instructor. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/98721

This course is intended for students who have developed the beginnings of a practice they are prepared to pursue. The motive is to assemble a group of disparate practitioners who come together to exchange thoughts across disciplines: painting next to photography next to writing next to filmmaking, and so on. 

AFVS 50B - Introduction to Non Fiction Filmmaking

AFVS 50B - Introduction to Non Fiction Filmmaking - Ross McElwee 
W 12:00-2:45, F 12:00-4:15 

Registration: Pre-requisite: AFVS 50A 

Introductory exercises in live-action 16mm filmmaking culminating in the production of a nonfiction film as a group project in the spring term. Students must complete both terms of this course (part A and part B) within the same academic year to receive credit. 

AFVS 52 - Introduction to Non Fiction Videomaking 

AFVS 52 - Introduction to Non Fiction Videomaking - Joana Pimenta 
TuTh 12:00-2:45

Registration: There will be a live Zoom meeting with Professor Joana Pimenta and Teaching Fellow Julia Sharpe on January 18 at 3pm (ET), followed by individual conversations with the interested students at 3:30pm; Zoom link is on Canvas course site.

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101875

This course is an introduction to documentary filmmaking. We will explore a range of approaches to nonfiction filmmaking through assignments which encompass video and sound recording and editing, cinematography and montage. Following introductory camera, sound and editing exercises, each student will spend the semester making a single nonfiction film on a subject of their choice. Class time will include technical workshops, film screenings, discussions of student work and occasional visiting filmmakers. 

AFVS 53 - Fundamentals of Animation

AFVS 53 - Fundamentals of Animation - Ruth Lingford 
Th 12:00-4:00 & F 12:00-2:00 

Course Preview Period info session on Friday, January 14 at 10am-11am; see Canvas site for link.   

Registration: Drawing skills are optional, though helpful. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101150

An introduction to the possibilities of animation. Using a mixture of traditional and 2D digital tools, students will complete practical exercises which will familiarize them with basic skills and techniques. Screenings and discussions will help develop the specialized thinking needed to understand the discipline. There are film screenings for this course on Fridays at 12pm. 

AFVS 60X - Approaching Narrative: Introduction to Filmmaking

AFVS 60X - Approaching Narrative: Introduction to Filmmaking - Akosua Adoma Owusu 
MW 3:00-5:45 

Please find instructions to register for this course on the Canvas site: https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/100915/pages/read-this-shopping-week-and-enrollment-instructions

Registration: First year students and those who have not yet taken any courses in film or video are strongly encouraged to take the course. No prior filmmaking experience necessary. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/100915

In this production course, students will learn the basic principles of narrative filmmaking, experiment with the visual language of cinema, and push the boundaries of their own moving image work. Students will be introduced to the aesthetic and formal elements of cinema and the terminology of film production. Techniques explored include cinematography, sound recording, and editing. In-class screenings and lectures will give an overview of different modes of filmmaking, including narrative, documentary, and experimental. Students will hone their powers of observation, communicate visual ideas with clarity and simplicity, explore personal storytelling, and develop the ability to read films as trained and informed viewers. Classes will consist of weekly critiques of student work. By the end of the course, students will be equipped with the necessary tools to produce two short 5-7 minute films with sync sound.

AFVS 150B - Film Direction: From Script to Screen

AFVS 150B - Film Direction: From Script to Screen - Dominga Sotomayor 
TuTh 12:00-2:45

Registration: Recommended Prep: AFVS 150A or two courses in video production. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/98545

This production course is an advanced continuation of 150A. It is compulsory for students to have the first draft of their short screenplays on the first day of class. Content includes scene analysis and script revision, directing professional and non-professional actors, cinematography, blocking and mise-en-scène, sound design, editing and post-production. Students will be given assignments related to their written screenplays throughout the course, culminating in what will be their final project: the production of a narrative short film. Film professionals will occasionally be invited to conduct workshops or hold masterclasses with students. 

AFVS 153BR - Intermediate Animation

AFVS 153BR - Intermediate Animation - Ruth Lingford 
W 12:00-4:00 & F 12:00-2:00 

Course Preview Period info session on Friday, January 14 at 10am-11am; see Canvas site for link.   

RegistrationRecommended Prep : AFVS 53AR, another related AFVS course, or other relevant experience. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101879

This course offers returning animators a chance to extend and deepen skills and understanding of animation and to make a more substantial piece of work. Additional exercises encourage students to challenge themselves and explore a range of creative possibilities. 

AFVS 157L - Immersive Experience As Art

AFVS 157L - Immersive Experience As Art - Young Joo Lee 
Tu 12:00-4:00 & F 12:00-2:00

RegistrationPre-requisite for this course: There is no prior knowledge of Unity 3D and Blender required, but it is helpful. Your knowledge and basic skills in visual art and digital media production are helpful in completing the assignments.

Enrollment Procedure: There are two ways to enroll in this course.

  1. Please email the instructor with a brief explanation of your interest in the course, prior experience of creative work, and a short description (max. 4 sentences) of a project that you would like to develop if you have one.
  2. There will be a course preview Zoom meeting (Links to an external site.) on January 14th from 4 - 5pm (EST).

If you cannot make it to this meeting, but want to schedule a Zoom meeting, please sign up HERE (Links to an external site.)

*Students will be notified about their enrollment in this course by January 19th 12pm. Students are responsible to send petition via my.harvard and confirm their enrollment. If the enrollment is not confirmed by the students till January 19th 6pm, people on the waitlist will be given their spot. 

*Even though we welcome everyone who is interested in this course, if there are more people interested in taking the course than the course enrollment capacity, priority is given to AFVS majors, AFVS joint-concentrators, and then seniors. In the past, we had a wonderful mix of people from freshmen to Graduate students. You can view the works created by previous students here: https://www.afvsstudio.com/afvs-157l (Links to an external site.)

ZOOM LINK for all meetings : https://harvard.zoom.us/j/5240981743?pwd=Rlh1L3FWZlRvNDJRTlJJYnUyVm96dz09

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/99847

This course is a studio class that investigates immersive experience as a form of art. Utilizing moving images, sound, installation, and Virtual Reality, we will experiment and develop different methods to create immersive experiences. Starting with the history of immersive media, the class will discuss the relationship between the experience of art and technological development. We will screen examples of relevant artworks and analyze the technical aspects and conceptual background of these works. Throughout the semester, students will develop projects reflecting on the discussions and using the tools learned in the class. Critiques and presentations of the students’ works are an essential part of the class.

AFVS 158AR - Sensory Ethnography 1

AFVS 158AR - Sensory Ethnography 1 - Verena Paravel 
TuTh 6:00-7:15 

Course preview information session will be Sunday, Jan. 16 at 10-10:30AM ET on Zoom, followed by brief individual interviews. Interview sign-ups will be held during the info session.

Registration: Students must also be enrolled in AFVS 158BR, Sensory Ethnography 2. No previous studio experience necessary. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101878

Students use video and audio to produce short works about embodied experience, culture, and nature. 

AFVS 158BR - Sensory Ethnography 2 

AFVS 158BR - Sensory Ethnography 2 - Verena Paravel & Lucien Castaing-Taylor 
TuTh 7:30-8:45 

Course preview information session will be Sunday, Jan. 16 at 10-10:30AM ET on Zoom, followed by brief individual interviews. Interview sign-ups will be held during the info session.

Registration: Students must also be enrolled in AFVS 158AR, Sensory Ethnography 1. No previous studio experience necessary. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101877

Students are introduced to current issues in art, aesthetics, and anthropology, and produce collaborative experimental works of sensory ethnography. 

AFVS 70 - The Art of Film

AFVS 70 - The Art of Film - Laura Frahm 
TuTh 10:30-11:45, Tu 6pm-9pm for film screenings 

Course Preview Period informal Info Session: Tuesday, January 18, at 10:30am. Zoom link available on Canvas course site.

Registration: This course is required for all students concentrating in or pursuing a secondary field in the film and visual studies area of AFVS. 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/98694

This introductory course surveys the history of film and visual media in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will both explore the rise of major cinematic movements in their striving to define the “art of film” and shed light on the often overlooked parts and marginalized figures in the history of film. Building upon Rudolf Arnheim’s concept of visual thinking, this class puts special emphasis on creative practices and visual exercises that introduce students to new forms of visual expression and argumentation. Weekly video blogs, a visual essay, and a collaborative film festival project will further advance and diversify our multi-faceted approach to the history of film and visual media.

AFVS 160 - Modernization in the Visual United States Environment

AFVS 160 - Modernization in the Visual United States Environment, 1890-2035 - John Stilgoe 
TuTh 9:00-10:15 

Course Preview Period info session: Jan. 12 from 9:30-10am; Zoom link available on Canvas course site

Registration: Offered jointly with the Graduate School of Design as HIS 4303. GSD students should enroll in this course via the GSD. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/100257 

Modernization of the US visual environment as directed by a nobility creating new images and perceptions of such themes as wilderness, flight, privacy, clothing, photography, feminism, status symbolism, and futurist manipulation as illustrated in print-media and other advertising enterprise. 

AFVS 167 - Adventure and Fantasy Simulation, 1871-2036: Seminar

AFVS 167 - Adventure and Fantasy Simulation, 1871-2036: Seminar - John Stilgoe 
Tu 12:00-2:45 

Info session TBD 

Registration: Offered jointly with the Graduate School of Design as HIS 4305. GSD students should enroll in this course via the GSD. To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/100805  

Fantasy opens portals to new life forms.  It prepares us for supranatural humans, genetic adjustment, non-electronic novelty.  It forms the core of natural-world reverence, maybe worship, the religion of the green future.  It cherishes solitary, low-tech adventure in natural and neo-natural environments, typically northern forests and fashion-magazine imagery.  It is a genre, a haphazard collection, a force as amorphous as blowing leaves, a western-European device born about 1900 and now global, but always quasi-imperialist, always of the north.  It scares public-school teachers who loathe Hogwarts, the Old Religion, the never-ending ancient tradition so deeply rooted in the European cultural past that it shapes contemporary propriety.  Holly and other evergreens bedeck churches at Christmas, but not mistletoe, the evergreen that killed the Norse sun god, Balder, the sky-tree Druids brought west from the Danube and grafted onto oaks, the Yule sovereign that permits kisses forbidden at all other seasons, part of the merry (not happy) in Christmas.  Quality fantasy teaches that every tree species once had individual character (willows walk, sometimes assault: the Whomping Willow behaves naturally) and that the most powerful (mistletoe included) once named the letters of the alphabet, that the year had thirteen lunar months marking the earth-mother menstrual cycle, that the seasons proved weird to those in the know, witches especially.  Out of the great northern arc from Finland to Ireland (stabbed by the westward-moving Celts and the Albion wraiths) originates quality contemporary fantasy, much of it written by British writers schooled in Latin from childhood.  It comprises a grimoire of irresistible power.   As climate change melts Arctic ice and opens new sea lanes, as Canada hurriedly builds a large navy, the north becomes more important politically, economically, and militarily—but its emerging conceptual importance orders this course this term.   Cold, discomfort, swimming in the winter ocean, trusting to quality attire, knives, and open boats, seeing sideways in the winter dark, finding what one must find in the arboreal forests, all fuses into the meaning of north.  Already fantasy slides past materialist and leftist ideology.  It prepares children for authentic change. 

AFVS 169S - Remapping Latin American Cinema: Chilean Film/Video

AFVS 169S - Remapping Latin American Cinema: Chilean Film/Video 1968-2022 - Haden Guest & Dominga Sotomayor 
MW 3:00-5:45 

Course Preview Period Info Session: Tuesday, Jan. 18 at 1pm; Zoom link available on Canvas course site  

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures: 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/99831

This class explores multiple perspectives on Chilean cinema from 1968 to today, looking closely at the political engagement of documentary and narrative filmmakers while also exploring the rich dialogue between film and the other arts that has long animated filmmaking in the Southern Cone nation. A key goal will be to locate Chile on an alternate map of Latin American cinema defined less by national borders than by transnational currents at work across the region. This hybrid making and film studies class co-taught by Chilean filmmaker Dominga Sotomayor and film scholar Haden Guest will include filmmaker visits and interactive workshop. 

AFVS 175L - Queer (and Queering) Cinema

AFVS 175L - Queer (and Queering) Cinema – Dennis Lim 
M 3:00-5:00, Tu 12-2:45 for film screenings 

Interested students are invited to a live zoom shopping session on Tuesday, January 18, from 12–1 pm ET - see Canvas site for Zoom link and a link to a questionnaire:

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/99801

This course seeks to map a history and to expand the boundaries of what is commonly thought of as queer cinema. We will explore LGBTQ films within a variety of frameworks, including but not limited to queer history, theory, and politics, and across a range of modes and genres, from classical Hollywood to the experimental underground. Looking beyond a predominantly white Western canon, we will consider examples of queer films from around the world, and the cultural and cinematic contexts from which they emerged. Throughout the course we will also engage with larger issues of representation and resistance, the practice of queer reading, and the question of queer form and queer aesthetics.

AFVS 97 – Sophomore Tutorial

AFVS 97 – Sophomore Tutorial – David Joselit 
M 12:00-2:30 

Registration: Required of all AFVS concentrators during their first full term in the concentration, ordinarily sophomore spring. 

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/99563

AFVS 355R: Advanced Critical Media Practice

AFVS 355R: Advanced Critical Media Practice - Joana Pimenta
Th 3-5:45pm

Registration: To take this limited-enrollment course, you must first consult the Canvas course site for information about the enrollment process and procedures. Interviews on Zoom will take place on Tuesday, Jan 18, 1-2.30pm. Students can find the Zoom link and sign up for an interview slot on the course Canvas site:

https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/101876

This course is for graduate students pursuing the PhD Secondary Field in Critical Media Practice, as well as for other students creating artistic or interpretive media projects that are complementary to their scholarship.  Open to any media or subject matter, the course is centered around exhaustive, constructive critique, supplemented by workshops, screenings and visiting artists.